FRANKFURT SCHOOL

BLOG

INTERNATIONAL
Living in Frankfurt as an International Student
Master of Finance / 15 August, 2019
  • Share

  • 1089

  • 0

  • Print
Master of Finance Class of 2020
Jessica Wang is a Master of Finance student and FS Ambassador at Frankfurt School. She holds a Bachelor in Commerce from the National Chengchi University, Taiwan.

To Author's Page

More Blog Posts
Mit IMAP in die faszinierende Welt grenzüberschreitender Transaktionen
Individually strong. Together excellent. Your entry into Warth & Klein Grant Thornton
Getting to know Nomura

Before enrolling in the Master of Finance programme at Frankfurt School, I completed my Bachelor of Finance degree at National Chengchi University and worked for 2 years in the field of corporate banking. So far I’ve been studying at Frankfurt School for 2 semesters and am currently working for a fin-tech startup.

Why I joined the MoF?

During my bachelors, I did a 1-year exchange programme with Frankfurt School. Throughout my exchange, I was impressed by the quality of education, the competence of peers and a close connection to the industry that Frankfurt School offers. Furthermore, as Frankfurt is the financial center of Europe, various internship opportunities were provided here. Not to mention the chance to learn a new language and immerse in a completely foreign environment; Frankfurt School has since then been on the top of my list.

Benefits of Frankfurt School

One thing that I find quite valuable about Frankfurt School is the number of career fairs, recruitment workshops and alumni networking events it offers. For the past year, I frequently participated in alumni panel discussions, interacted with company recruiting personnel and met inspiring people in networking events. Those experiences have broadened my horizons, enabled me to make friends outside my social circle and also allowed me to make decisions based on helpful advice provided by people with different perspectives.

Prepare for Cultural Differences

No doubt there are cultural differences between Taiwan and Germany. Differences might seem challenging so you should be well informed. Here are some tips for you:

  1. Always plan and check the opening hours; at best, contact the counterpart for an appointment to ensure your issues are dealt with efficiently;
  2. As an international student living in Germany without family and friends, it might be difficult to find things to do on Sundays, thus it’s important to have a hobby, make new friends or simply be comfortable with doing things on your own;
  3. Many people say you can live and work in Frankfurt using only English, from my point of view, knowing German is an essential part of integration and will definitely add depth to your overall abroad experience. Therefore, it’s highly recommended to start learning German as soon as possible.

As Molière once said, “The greater the obstacle, the more glory in overcoming it.” I have chosen Germany to pursue further education and advance my career not because it’s easy or comfortable; instead, studying in a non-English speaking country could sometimes be quite difficult. Nevertheless, I believe no matter how challenging it is ahead of me, Frankfurt School has what it takes to prepare me for it.